We’ll Always Have Paris in Fall

PARIS HAUTE COUTURE:  FALL/WINTER 2016-2017


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This season, Stephane Rolland delivered an excellent Haute Couture collection of robes sculptures in the very French tradition of Madeleine Vionnet, Alix Grès and Yves Saint Laurent. The Couturier’s white, black, grey, and silvery palette magnified the lean silhouettes, which seemed sharper and purer. Surrealistic touches like a brilliant black dress with a cutout on a thigh in trompe-l’oeil that made the skin look ‘embossed’ on the dress, as well as the aesthetic of black and white portraits and fashion photography recalling legendary images by Man Ray or Jean Loup Sieff, paid tribute to Paris’ history as a fashion capital.

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For her Atelier Versace collection, Donatella draped pastel and deep hued satin onto dresses and outfits with geometrical cuts. The luxurious satin touches added a slightly historicising twist, while the glittering, figure-hugging gowns with razor-sharp cutouts and curvy shreds delicately pieced together like the cracks on a seashell turned the Versace power woman into a glamorous mermaid.

Georges Hobeika presented a traditional Haute Couture collection: luxurious evening gowns in princess shapes and dresses with slightly Renaissance cuts in vivid colours, colourful wild flower embroidery and feminine pastel lace.

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As for Jean Paul Gaultier, the Couturier splendidly paid tribute to Fall and the forest with a tree leitmotif and  spectacular work on fabric, as wood prints with tree rings and wood grain in various earthly tones appeared on entire silk outfits and dresses. One could recognize Gaultier’s taste for exoticism, which was humorously expressed through the different types of wood prints featured, like mahogany, ash, white oak, red oak, etc. The various shades of green and orange winked at autumnal leaves, while the colourful fur collars alluded to the wildlife of the forest.

Last but not least, Franck Sorbier’s collection was inspired by Russian tales and Slav Orthodox tradition, which was partly made up of colourful dresses for little girls. Velvet tutus, ushanka hats, matryoshka-inspired dresses, pom poms, raffia, embroidered lace and hand-painted taffeta silk all expressed the whimsical creativity that we always find in Sorbier’s work.

Louise Kissa
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