UN says Iran committed to nuclear deal

EPA/PRESIDENTIAL OFFICIAL WEBSITE

A handout picture made available by the Iranian President's official website on 18 December 2016 of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (R) welcoming the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Yukiya Amano (L) at the presidential office, in Tehran, Iran.

UN says Iran committed to nuclear deal


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The United Nations atomic energy watchdog chief, Yukiya Amano, told reporters in Tehran on December 18 that Iran has shown full commitment to an internationally-backed deal on its nuclear programme. His statement follows Iran’s decision to start working on nuclear-powered vessels and complaints over the US disrespect for the deal.

“We are satisfied with the implementation of the [agreement] and hope that this process will continue,” he said, Iran’s IRNA news agency.

“Iran has been committed to its engagement so far and this is important,” Amano was quoted as saying after a meeting with Iran’s nuclear chief Ali Akbar Salehi.

As reported by Tehran Times, Amano arrived at Tehran on December 18 for “high-level consultation with between Iran and the [International Atomic Energy Agency] IAEA”.

Tehran has complained that the recent US Congress vote to a bill which extends sanctions against Iran for another ten years infringes on the terms of the nuclear deal.

“We are satisfied with the implementation of the [agreement] and hope that this process will continue,” Yukiya Amano says.

But Washington says the Iran Sanctions Act would not affect the overall implementation of the nuclear agreement.

Under the deal reached in 2015, Iran rolled back its nuclear programme in exchange for relief from economic sanctions, mainly imposed by the US and European countries.

In a separate report, The Associated Press (AP) noted that the IAEA in November said Iran exceeded its heavy water limit by 100kg over the 130 metric tonnes allowed under the agreement. Heavy water is used to cool reactors that produce plutonium, which can be used in atomic bombs.

Iran later said it transferred 11 tonnes of heavy water to Oman.

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