U.K leaving the Single Market leads to hard border in Ireland

PAUL MCERLANE

An aerial view of the British Army watchtower post 'Golf One Zero' at Preeve Keernan in South Armagh, Northern Ireland, Monday 01 August, 2005. The Northern Ireland-based battalions of the Royal Irish Regiment are to be disbanded as part of the Army response to the IRA ending its armed campaign.

U.K leaving the Single Market leads to hard border in Ireland


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Legal experts are concerned that an open border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland is not possible after Brexit, The Irish Times reported on Monday.

EU customs and trade lawyers Michael Lux and Eric Pickett wrote that an envisaged “special deal” is unlikely.

Prime Minister Enda Kenny has repeatedly argued that the Common Travel Area between Britain and Ireland will not give way to a hard border with Northern Ireland. Irish Customs will have to perform risk-based random checks on cargoes and individuals to ensure dues are paid and the system is not abused. To protect its financial interests, the UK will have comparable rules.

The result will be the disruption of the economy. For example, yogurt producers in Northern Ireland using milk from the Republic and distributing across the island will have to review their value chain to limit border crossings.

“When the UK exits the customs union of the EU, the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland will become an external customs Border,” they wrote in the Irish examiner.

Las week, the British Prime Minister Theresa May presented a white paper on Brexit to parliament. The British Brexit plan foresees U.K’s exit from the single market and the Custom’s Union, which makes border controls inevitable. Cross-border commuting for work or shopping will thus become harder.

epa05441699 British Prime Minister Theresa May (R) shakes hands with Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny (L) in the White Room during their meeting at 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, 26 July 2016. May met with Kenny for post brexit discussions, closely related to the border elements pertaining to Northern Ireland and The Republic of Ireland.  EPA/ANDY RAIN

British Prime Minister Theresa May (R) shakes hands with Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny (L) in the White Room during their meeting at 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, 26 July 2016. May met with Kenny for post brexit discussions, closely related to the border elements pertaining to Northern Ireland and The Republic of Ireland. EPA/ANDY RAIN

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