Tusk asks MEPs to back British voters who want to remain in the EU

EPA-EFE//PATRICK SEEGER

President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, delivers his speech at the debate on the Conclusions of the European Council meeting at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, 27 March 2019.

Tusk asks MEPs to back British voters who want to remain in the EU


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European Council President Donald Tusk urged MEPs to act the European voice of the “increasing majority” of British people who want to cancel Brexit and stay in the EU.

“You cannot betray the six million people who signed the petition to revoke Article 50 and the one million people who marched for a People’s Vote, or the increasing majority of people who want to remain in the EU,” said Tusk, who criticised those that refuse to accept UK MEPs in the chamber after the May European elections. He added that an increasing majority of British citizens “may feel that they are not sufficiently represented by the UK Parliament, but they must feel that they are represented by you in this chamber. Because they are Europeans”

“Before the European Council, I said that we should be open to a long extension if the UK wishes to rethink its Brexit strategy, which would, of course, mean the UK’s participation in the European Parliament elections,” said Tusk.

The European Commission’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier responded to a question posed by firebrand pro-Brexit MEP, Nigel Farage, who posed an open question to the European Parliament in which he asked his colleagues whether they would like him to return as an MEP.

“No one is trying to steal Brexit from you, no one is trying to undo the vote of the British people”, but the UK would have to bear the consequences of its decision to leave in the manner that it has. “You made that choice, you must take responsibility and face up to the consequences. Nobody else”.

On the extension granted until 12 April, Barnier said that the 12 April extension that was granted to British Prime Minister Theresa May was done to “open up the possibility for the UK to shoulder the responsibility of their decision”.

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