Turkish asylum seekers in Germany double

OLIVER BERG

Kurds and Alevi with flags and banners protest against the Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, in Cologne, Germany, 12 November 2016. Around 10,000 Alevi and Kurds gathered for a demonstration against the policies of Turkish President Erdogan.

But, there is no political consensus on admitting them


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4,437 Turkish citizens have applied for asylum in Germany from January to October 2016, Funke Mediengruppe reported on Friday.

Last year there were just under 2000 application.

The number of applications has averaged 350 a month, surging to 485 in October.

The surge is linked to a purge of over 100,000 academics, journalists, the army, and the judiciary have been dismissed and/or arrested.

Earlier this month, the Social Democrat State Minister for Europe, Michael Roth, said Germany will welcome asylum applications from intellectuals prosecuted in Turkey. Speaking to the daily Die Welt, he asserted the government did not agree with the prosecution of lawmakers, critical journalists and academics.

But, there is no consensus in parliament for accepting them.

The Bavarian Christian Social Union (CSU) politician, Stephan Mayer, says opponents of Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan should not apply for asylum. The CSU politician is spearheading a revolt of the Christian Democratic Party’s sister party in Bavaria that opposes Chancellor Merkel’s immigration policy. “We cannot solve Turkey’s problems by inviting all critical citizens to apply for asylum here. That is exactly what he wants: the opposition disappears,” Mayer says.

Turkey’s Foreign Minister, Mevlut Cavusoglu, has accused Germany of lending its support to terrorist groups such as the Kurdish PKK and far-leftist DHKP-C.

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