On Monday, Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan offered “condolences” but no apology for the “grandchildren of Ottoman Armenians who lost their lives in harsh circumstances of World War I.”

The same day, a Turkish Prosecutor moved to indict Fetullah Gulen over the 2007 assassination of the newspaper Agos, Hrant Dink. When Dink was assassinated in 2007, tens of thousands of Turkish citizens marched chanting “We are all Hrant Dink.”

The Turkish President did not come close to an acknowledgment of the Armenian genocide. April 24 is remembered by Armenians as the beginning of the extermination of 1,5 million Armenians, which Turkey has long denied is an event that constitutes genocide. The official Turkish historical narrative is that Armenians died in the Syrian Desert where they were marched by Ottoman forces, allegedly for their own safety. Meanwhile, Ankara sees the recognition of the Armenian genocide continues to be seen as a diplomatically hostile act. For decades, Washington has refrained from using the term genocide, unlike Berlin and Paris.

Meanwhile, Ankara treats the recognition of the Armenian genocide continues to be seen as a diplomatically hostile act. For decades, Washington has refrained from using the term genocide. On Monday, President Erdogan’s resuscitated interest in the Armenian “loss of life” coincided with an official indictment against Fethullah Gulen, the Philadelphia-based cleric and former political ally of the ruling AKP party.

Gulen is charged with orchestrating the July 15 attempted coup in Turkey and is now considered a suspect in the Hrant Dink assassination.

The only individual arrested in connection with the murder of Hrant Dink is the gunman, Ogun Samast, who was 17-year old at the time. One decade later, authorities have apparently come up with new evidence linking the former prosecutor Zekeriya Oz, the former editor-in-chief of the Gulenist Zaman newspaper Ekrem Dumanli and journalists Adem Yavuz Arslan, Faruk Mercan and Ercan Gun with conspiracy to kill Hrant Dink.