Trump to visit to the UK on a Friday the 13th

ANDY RAIN

Protesters wearing masks depicting British Prime Minister Theresa May (L) and US President Donald J. Trump (R) and holding hands demonstrate against the proposed State visit to the UK of Donald Trump in London, Britain, 20 February 2017. Parliament is debating the proposed state visit of US President Donald J. Trump to Britain. Nearly two million Britons have signed a petition against his visit.

Trump to visit to the UK on a Friday the 13th


Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+

U.S. President Donald Trump will travel to Britain on Friday, July 13, in a highly controversial visit that the UK hopes will verify there is only one special relationship.

The visit of President Emmanuel Macron in Washington, as well as the apparent chemistry between the two Presidents, has not been entirely ignored by the BBC and other media, platforms, despite a full news agenda occupied by Brexit. While there is an open question as to whether France has an equally special relationship, the UK can still boast that Theresa May was the first leader to visit after President Trump’s inauguration in January 2017. Apparently, returning the visit was long overdue.

However, the question ‘what could go wrong’ during this forthcoming visit is not raised by the superstitious alone.

President Trump’s so-called working visit is controversial, as the Trump has attacked the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, over the terrorist attacks in London, retweeted videos by a British far-right group and has time and again expressed Islamophobic sentiment, not least by advocating a ban for Muslims entering the United States. During his campaign to gain the nomination of the Republican Party, campaigners in the UK were calling for a ban on his entry to the UK.  Many things could go seriously wrong, given the President Trump’s notorious lack of adherence to protocol.

 The apparently unanswered question is whether, for instance, President Trump would have the chance to meet with the royal family, given that Prince Charles is a keen environmental campaigner. And that is only one of the many events in which the British government will need all the luck it can summon.

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+