Theresa May and Trump meet in Davos

EPA-EFE/FELIPE TRUEBA

US President Donald J. Trump (L) and British Prime Minister Theresa May (R) during a plenary session of the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, 07 July 2017

Theresa May and Trump meet in Davos


Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+

Donald Trump won’t have to wait for a new invitation to travel to London to meet with Theresa May after the two leaders met for a private meeting on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in Davos

May’s meeting with Trump gave the two a chance to talk trade after Brexit, discuss terrorism, and perhaps patch up the “special relationship” after a row over the opening of a new US embassy in London and other remarks made by Trump.

Trump cancelled a visit to Britain after saying he was not “a big fan” of the new billion dollar embassy that he was due to inaugurate.

A controversy over Trump’s lewd comments about poor, largely non-white countries in Africa and Latin America,  is also looming over the Davos meeting, Some Davos attendees will reportedly walk out of Trump’s speech on Friday to protest his remarks, which many perceived to be racist.

May will put technology giants under pressure to clean up their act and tackle extreme content when she addresses the conference.

 “Investors can make a big difference here by ensuring trust and safety issues are being properly considered. And I urge them to do so.

These companies simply cannot stand by while their platforms are used to facilitate child abuse, modern slavery or the spreading of terrorist and extremist content.”

Earlier in the day the UK Finance Minister Philip Hammond said he was “very happy” with the strength of pound sterling, which hit its highest level since the Brexit vote.

John McDonnell, Labour’s shadow minister of finance, who is also at Davos, had a warning for the global elite, telling top business people and world leaders that they’re dangerously insulated from the problems outside WEF’s security cordon and exclusive parties:

“Many of those attending the World Economic Forum have been patting themselves on the back as international growth figures have begun to pick up.“But they should be worried. In the real world, outside the Davos bubble of Alpine restaurants and chalets, the global economic system they have built isn’t working for billions of people.

“And just as Davos faces the risk of an avalanche this week, growth for a few risks a political and social avalanche unless there is fundamental change to our rigged economic system.

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+