Theresa May downplays Conservative Party links to Cambridge Analytica

SIMON DAWSON / POOL

British Prime Minister Theresa May during a press conference after a meeting with new Taoiseach Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar (not seen) at 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, 19 June 2017. Taoiseach Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar on a first foreign visit meets with British PM May to discuss Brexit negotiations which started today

Theresa May downplays Conservative Party links to Cambridge Analytica


Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+

The British government had three contracts in the past with Cambridge Analytica’s parent company SCL Group, that is, the company at the epicenter of a data-leakage with a bearing on the EU membership referendum.

Specifically, the company offered the Leave campaign its services.

During Prime Ministers’ questions on Wednesday, Theresa May admitted that Cambridge Analytica had a contract with the Ministry of Defence (2014-2015), the Home Office (2009) and the Foreign Office (2008-2009). That runs through the administrations of Gordon Brown (2009-2010) and David Cameron (2010-2016).

The British Prime Minister said that it is “absolutely right” that Facebook and Cambridge Analytica are investigated, while promising a new data protection bill.

Apparently, there are no current government contracts with Cambridge Analytica. The company has seen its public profile unravel, as a Channel 4 investigation revealed other questionable practices by the company, including smear campaigns and so-called “honey traps.”

The question came from the Scottish National Party – MP Ian Blackford – who pointed out that SCL is run by the chairman of the Oxford Conservative Association, a major donor of the party, and a former Member of Parliament.

In a brief statement, the Conservative Party made clear that Cambridge Analytica was never contracted for any campaign.

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+