The Year of Confusion

Photo credit - ALEXANDROS MICHAILIDIS

The Year of Confusion


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This article is part of New Europe’s: Our World in 2017

Belgium – Brussels  This year, will be a bad year for the European Union. It will be a year of generalised confusion, contradictions, confrontations, lies and the repetition of the same mistakes.

The problems and issues that should be centrally addressed by the European Union and the European Commission are many and different in nature. All of them, however, have a common denominator. They must all be politically addressed. Unfortunately, in our Europe, politics is missing to a large extent.

In the Member States, political leaders are few and these few are in countries with no real power – not to say that this category of leaders cannot be classified within the conventional democratic spectrum, but rather they are identified in the margins of the extremes.

Many of our problems should be addressed by the European Commission. In this case, we need to consider two elements.

Problems like immigration and unemployment involve large numbers of people. This implies a different than usual approach necessary for their solution. In mathematics, there is a field dealing with mathematics of large numbers. It is called logic.

In immigration and unemployment, we are not talking about the tens of thousands of farmers who march to Brussels each year for a peaceful demonstration that ends with a vague promise and a party with hot dogs and beers in rond-point Schuman. We are talking about 25 million young unemployed scattered throughout the Union and who have completed excellent studies and have brilliant minds, but are angry, hungry and frustrated. Their only possession in their pocket is a smartphone. All of them – the offspring of austerity and over-regulation, which kills every small initiative before it can start – are potential cyber-terrorists. Thus, if one day Europe wakes up in chaos, with its main networks down, do not be surprised. One out of these 25 million is enough.

About immigration, the question is how the European Commission can handle this unprecedented challenge if no agreement among Member States can be reached.

But there are other problems of pure political nature which the European Commission should be able to easily handle, but does not because politicians are kept out and issues are handled by technocrats. Regrettably, it is not the Commissioners who rule, but their cabinets. Just think that even the President of the European Commission Jean Claude Juncker – a man of values who has a great political career in a very politicised country – does not even control his own correspondence.

The European Commission invested a lot in the British referendum and it lost because this highly political matter was handled by linear thinking administrators and incompetent communicators.

Britain voted to get out of the EU. However, it remains to be seen if, how and when. As a matter of fact, what Europeans initially thought would spell catastrophe for Britain has turned out to be a great opportunity for London to gain more concessions in negotiating the way out. Thus, Brexit could become a new status of participation for the United Kingdom in the EU, with much more benefits. The explanation is simple. Brits are politicians.

Finally speaking about real politics. The rise of the far right in Europe.

France is facing the most imminent problem as François Fillon, who is likely to be elected President of France in the upcoming elections, may well prove more far right than Marine Le Pen because he must consolidate his electorate.

The far right is striving all over Europe and in certain EU countries will be democratically elected to power, as Adolf Hitler was democratically elected German Chancellor in 1933.

There is not one single solution for all our problems. However, there is a common starting point.

In life, everything is politics. Whatever you do or do not do is politics. Politics is the common starting point.

Liberate people and let them be free to produce, create and hope.

Deregulation, the abolishment of austerity, freezing of debt for 100 years and 5% annual inflation will be sufficient to revitalise the economy, give jobs to the jobless and see people’s faith in the future restored.

And possibly, one more courageous step forward, is to abolish the Euro currency.

Yes, let’s do it in an orderly fashion before the far-rightists and neo-communists do it in a chaotic disorderly way.

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