Strong indications suggest the discovery of Aristotle’s tomb, no hard evidence found

EPA/ALK. HOREMI / HANDOUT

A handout photograph showing a Roman-era marble bust of Greek philosopher Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC), Athens, Tuesday 24 October 2006.

Greek archaeologist, Konstantinos Sismanidis said that after 25 years of excavation he has strong indications that the ancient structure found at Stagira, a village in Northern Greece is most probably the tomb-shrine of Aristotle


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After 25-year of excavation, Greek archaeologist, Konstantinos Sismanidis said that he is pretty confident that the ancient structure found at Stagira, a village in Northern Greece ten of years ago, is most probably the “tomb-shrine of Aristotle.”

Aristotle, was born in Stagira at 384 B.C. and he died in Evia, Greece in 322 B.C. It is said that after his death, he was cremated and transferred back to Stagira.

On Thursday, Sismanidis said at a conference in Thessaloniki, Greece, commemorating the 2,400th anniversary of Aristotle’s birth that even though he has no proof that the tomb shrine belongs to Aristotle, he has strong indications which can make him say that his team “had found the tomb.”

He told to his fellow colleagues that his team has now “found the altar referred to in ancient texts, as well as the road leading to the tomb, which was very close to the city’s ancient marketplace within the city settlement.” He added that the tomb’s panoramic view, its positioning at the centre of a square marble floor and the time of its construction, “all lead to the conclusion that the remains of the arched structure are part of what was once the tomb-shrine of Aristotle.”

According to the local websites, the archaeologist dedicated 25 years of work searching for findings at the ancient structure and he started to believe that the tomb probably belonged to the great Greek philosopher in 1996 but then he simply said at the same conference that the ancient structure in Stagira, is a “troubling building” and more excavations should take place. Even though, the archaeologist retired he continued working at the excavation.

The Greek Culture Ministry didn’t confirm the finding and many in Greece are cautious because of the Amphipolis grave findings in 2015. Then an archaeologist claimed that she probably discovered the tomb of Alexander the Great but later on it was found out that the grave had probably been built for a close companion of the king and conqueror.

Aristotle is considered one of the first and most important Western philosophers and he wrote about all aspects of life. Perhaps his most well-known concept, is his doctrine about the mean and how lack of virtue is connected with the extremes.

 

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