Strong indications suggest the discovery of Aristotle’s tomb, no hard evidence found

EPA/ALK. HOREMI / HANDOUT

A handout photograph showing a Roman-era marble bust of Greek philosopher Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC), Athens, Tuesday 24 October 2006.

Greek archaeologist, Konstantinos Sismanidis said that after 25 years of excavation he has strong indications that the ancient structure found at Stagira, a village in Northern Greece is most probably the tomb-shrine of Aristotle


After 25-year of excavation, Greek archaeologist, Konstantinos Sismanidis said that he is pretty confident that the ancient structure found at Stagira, a village in Northern Greece ten of years ago, is most probably the “tomb-shrine of Aristotle.”

Aristotle, was born in Stagira at 384 B.C. and he died in Evia, Greece in 322 B.C. It is said that after his death, he was cremated and transferred back to Stagira.

On Thursday, Sismanidis said at a conference in Thessaloniki, Greece, commemorati...


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