State of the Race: Scott Walker withdraws candidacy for US President

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Photo from the US Republican Presidential debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library

State of the Race: Scott Walker withdraws candidacy for US President


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Scott Walker has officially withdrawn his candidacy for president and ended his campaign for the GOP nomination for 2016. Once considered a front-runner Walker saw much of his support decline as he built an apparatus for a national campaign instead of just focusing on the Iowa caucus as other candidates have done, and when he began to drop in the polls he simply ran out of the money he needed to continue the race.

In his closing speech Walker called for other flagging candidates to back out as well, to allow the field to clear for someone to usurp the highly popular Donald Trump

“I believe that I am being called to lead by helping to clear the field in this race so that a positive conservative message can rise to the top of the field. A positive conservative alternative to the current frontrunner”

Walker’s candidacy flaming out financially is nothing more than business as usual for American electoral politics, as the ability to fundraise and keep your campaign open is often more important than a candidate’s place in early polls.

15 candidates remain

While Walker is no longer in the race, the field is still muddled with candidates due to continue seeing mass fluctuations in the polls. However, now that Walker has left the field more candidates could soon be poised to drop out due to poll numbers and financial concerns. Lindsey Graham, who has very little in the way of money and vote share, will likely drop out of the race as soon as he accomplishes his goal of driving the field’s foreign policy to a more aggressive stance towards groups like ISIS and Iran.

Other individuals like Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum, will also likely depart from the race relatively soon due to their appeal to certain groups of highly religious voters, and lack appeal in a general election. Rand Paul, son of prominent libertarian Ron Paul, also is likely to drop out as he only holds 1% of the vote, drawing a sneer from Donald Trump during Thursday’s September 16 debate for his lack of popularity.

Can anyone beat Trump?

However, despite Scott Walker, Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum, and Lindsey Graham potentially dropping/dropped nobody really cares about anything in the race but how long Donald Trump will stay in it. Currently, Trump is leading in every poll by margins as large as 12% and according to realclearpolitics Trump has an advantage that averages to be about 9.7% ahead of anyone else in the field.

Trump, who has defined his candidacy with a bombastic style that many believe feeds of off racism  and extremism has proven to have more staying power than was originally believed. Now, there is talk of a consolidation in the ranks of GOP candidates to form a SuperPac designed to remind conservative voters that Donald Trump is not a true conservative candidate worth voting for. However, Trump has been on television since 1980 and he has shown that he is willing to attack back if he is attacked, making attempts to de-rail his candidacy a risky proposition. Jeb Bush and his team have put out an ad in Iowa against Trump, but Trump’s popularity and rise has been the most shocking thing in politics in 2015. Whether he manages to sustain all the way to the nomination is uncertain, but it is time to acknowledge that Donald Trump is tapping into something real within the American electorate.

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