Slovakia’s Fico peddles conspiracy theory after accusing president of Soros plot

EPA-EFE/JAKUB GAVLAK

Slovakian Prime Minister Robert Fico speaks during the press conference on reactions to the first public statement of Slovakian president Andrej Kiska (not seen) on murder of journalist Jan Kuciak and his fiance Martina Kusnirova in Bratislava, Slovakia, 04 March 2018.

Slovakia’s Fico peddles conspiracy theory after accusing president of Soros plot


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Slovakia’s Prime Minister Robert Fico accused the country’s President Andrej Kiska of destabilising the small East European nation that is still dealing with the political fallout after the murders of investigative journalist Ján Kuciak and his fiancee Martina Kusnirova.

Only 10 days after Kuciak’s was found murdered on February 25. Fico said on live TV that Kiska had exceeded his authority when he called for changes to the government and for early elections to resolve the current political crisis.

Fico joined the chorus of the anti-Western conspiracy theorists who see Soros’ hand in every aspect of life also accused Kiska “crossing a red line” and joined the chorus of the anti-Western conspiracy theorists who see Soros’ hand in every aspect of life. Fico called Soros “a very dangerous man.” According to Fico, Kiska needs to explain to the public why he visited Soros at his home in New York last September.

Kiska has not tried to hide his meeting with Soros, even posting photos of his visit on Facebook, along with other people he visited at the time. However, Fico, however, seized on his Soros saying Kiska was acting as an agent for “foreign forces” rather than in Slovakia’s interests.

Fico had decided “to attack people’s lowest instincts with conspiracy theories,” said Justice Minister Lucia Zitnanska, before adding, “this is a very inappropriate speech on the part of the head of government in a democratic country. Personally, I think this is unacceptable.”

Fico’s coalition partners also backed Zitnanska saying, “Instead of looking for solutions to the current political crisis, Fico is choosing to follow a dangerous path by looking for an external culprit,”

Unperturbed by the criticism, Fico was defiant when speaking with a pool of reporters on March 6. “You can accuse me of conspiracy theories, I don’t care,” Fico told reporters on Tuesday,

Fico’s initial response to the murders included a bizarre public offer of a €1 million reward for information leading to the arrest of the perpetrators. Fico made the offer in a televised address to the nation, with the €1 million in cash stacked next to him on a desk. The move was widely condemned in his country and it was then when Aktuality.sk published Kuciak’s last article, on Fico’s connections with mafia-related crime suspects that are wanted in Italy.

Since the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe, Soros has used his vast wealth to promote and fund various groups and organisations who promote democracy, tolerance, transparency, and the rule of law. His Open Society Foundations – including the Central European University in Budapest – have drawn the ire of most of the region’s authoritarian and populist leaders, as well as right-wing groups in the United States and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

His critics regularly include his name in wild accusations of being a vaguely defined “puppet master” that espouses liberal democratic values. Soros, who is Jewish, has also been subjected to anti-Semitic verbal attacks, with many on the right claiming he controls the world’s banking system.

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