Slovak PM claims that refugees can’t be integrated in “Western” societies

EPA/ETIENNE LAURENT

Slovakian Prime Minister Robert Fico

Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico says his government will not allow Muslims to create “a compact community,” claiming that integrating refugees is impossible.


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Muslims can’t integrate in Western societies, Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico claimed on Thursday.

Fico, took advantage of the sexual assaults in Cologne and linked them with the European refugee crisis. “We don’t want something like what happened in Germany, talking place in Slovakia,” the controversial PM said and added that Slovakian authorities must “prevent [its] women from being molested in public places.”

Fico’s government, holds an anti-EU immigration policy stand, as it filed a legal challenge last month to a mandatory plan by the European Union to distribute migrants among the EU Member States. Under the European Commission’s plan for relocating some of the refugees who arrived in Greece and Italy, Slovakia is being asked to take in 802 migrants but the PM used the Cologne sexual assaults to defend his anti-EU refugee policy.

The Slovak PM, told reporters that his government would “never make a voluntary decision that would lead to the formation of a unified Muslim community in Slovakia.” Currently, the EU country has a tiny Muslim community of several thousand and Slovakia only received 169 asylum requests in 2015.

Fico claimed that “the idea of multicultural Europe has failed” and that “the migrants cannot be integrated, it’s simply impossible.”

Besides the government of Slovakia, the Hungarian government has also challenged the mandatory quotas in court.

EU unsatisfied with Turkey as refugees and migrants continue to enter Greece

As the EU finds it extremely difficult to make the relocation program work, Turkey doesn’t contribute to halt the flow of refugees and migrants in the Union.

On Thursday, European Commission Vice-President Frans Timmermans said that arrivals into Europe from Turkey “have remained relatively high, so there is still a lot of work to do there.” Timmermans told reporters in Amsterdam that “we (the EU) are a long way from being satisfied (by Turkey).”

Turkey agreed in November to do more to stem the flow of migrants into Greece in exchange for three billions of euros in refugee aid money, an easing of visa restrictions and the fast-tracking of its EU membership process.

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