Šefčovič discusses changes facing Polish energy sector

NEW EUROPE/KOSTIS GEROPOULOS/FILE PICTURE

A train travelling from Gdansk to Gdynia, September 27, 2016. Poland can play an important part in the transition to renewable energy resources and energy efficiency, including the transport sector, according to the EU Commission.

Poland has a traditionally strong coal mining industry


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Poland can play an important part in the transition to renewable energy resources and energy efficiency, both in buildings and in the transport sector, Vice-President for Energy Union Maroš Šefčovič has said.

Šefčovič is traveling to Poland for the second Energy Union Tour on May 10-12.

Šefčovič will meet the Polish Energy Minister Krzysztof Tchórzewski to discuss the changes facing the Polish energy sector, the European Commission said. He will also provide an opening speech at the 9th European Economic Congress in Katowice on ‘The energy industry in Europe – the most important questions’. He will then take part in other high-level meetings with governmental officials and also engage in a wider debate with energy and business stakeholders at various events, including a roundtable discussion on Polish coal and carbon regions in transition and at the Regional Assembly of the Silesian and Małopolska Regions and European Start-Up Days.

“Europe is in the middle of the energy transition,” Šefčovič said ahead of the visit. “With its large renewable energy resources and great potential in energy efficiency, both in buildings and in the transport sector, Poland can play an important part in this transition,” he added.

The Commission Vice President for Energy Union reminded that Poland is also a country with a traditionally strong coal mining industry. “The Commission is committed to making sure that restructuring of the coal mining sector happens in a socially fair way and wants to provide targeted assistance in order to facilitate access to existing funds, encourage the exchange of good practices, support technology development and kick-off discussions on re-skilling needs and industrial roadmaps,” Šefčovič said.

He noted that the EU climate and energy targets and the legal framework in the Energy Union areas are matched with significant investment support from the EU budget. “Poland is the biggest beneficiary of the solidarity mechanisms under the EU Emissions Trading System,” he said.

 

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