The Resurrection of Finlandisation

The Resurrection of Finlandisation


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The central European administration is a political entity and all facets related to its operations and functions are secondary. This political entity consists of three institutions: The Council with the Courts of Justice and Auditors who depend totally on the Member States, the European Parliament which represents the citizens, and the European Commission which is the executive arm of the European Union or, to put it in more practical terms, the government of Europe.
At this point the European Union has only two options. To either return to its components, probably under the label of a “light” unification to meet the Anglo-Saxon goals, or to go ahead and further unite so that in a not-too-far distant day, to become one multi-nation country.
Placing the European Union into the perspective of its unification, not only economically but also socially and politically, which not necessarily will include all 25 or more but probably less States, one can clearly see the future of these three institutions.
The Council, which by its nature is a political hybrid, is destined to have the future of all hybrids – that is to have no future. As long as the integration of Europe will proceed, the Council will be fading out and eventually disappear, giving its place to a kind of Senate where all participating territories will be equally represented. As to the European Court of Justice and the Court of Auditors, they will fall under the jurisdiction of the European Parliament.
The Parliament will gradually gain the role of a completely independent body with full legislative and controlling authorities.
The European Commission is the government of Europe and it is the most sophisticated and the most efficient administrative machine in the world. The Commission is the real asset of Europe and the Commission is what makes citizens be proud of being Europeans.
The Commission, together with the Parliament, is the future of Europe and it should be left alone to work for Europe and its citizens. On short term expediencies, the ruling governments of the Member States want to have a weak Commission that will exert all of its discretionary powers to their favor. For the long- term interests of the citizens, the Commission should be further strengthened with more personnel and more independence to face the increased needs that resulted from the recent enlargement. The proposal of the Finnish presidency to reduce the Commission staff by a couple of thousand people is a serious attempt to further neutralize the central European administration and serves only the goals of those working for a weak Europe and an essence-less Commission. Finland, which for over half a century lived under Soviet- imposed  Finlandisation, is now attempting to “Finlandise” Europe so to better serve the geopolitical interests of its friends.
The reason we refer to this otherwise ridiculous proposal is that the Presidency allegedly set the agenda (although denies doing the same now), brought it to the Council without consultation with the European Commission and got it through under the garb of a Council.
Instead of attempting to weaken the Commission, serious Member States should work to strengthen it. A key problem is the Administrative Reform introduced by the Prodi Commission. We have now sufficient experience to judge and assess the Reform. Two examples are sufficient to underline the need to seriously consider either its abolition or its heavy and drastic revision. Outsourcing, as it was expected, has begun to prove beneficial not to Europe but only to certain American and British consulting firms. The annual evaluation of employees has destroyed the team-work spirit in the various units and is even wasting long-term friendships build with years of working together. Now, because of the Reform, excellent members of the Commission staff, instead of working together are trying to undermine one another in order to gain more points in the annual evaluation. These are the issues to be addressed by the EU presidency.

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