Poland’s ruling party calls for new constitution

EPA/PAWEL SUPERNAK

Law and Justice (PiS) leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski unveils a plaque commemorating his twin brother, former Polish President Lech Kaczynski as part of ceremonies marking the 6th anniversary of the Polish Presidential plane crash, at the Mazovieckie Province Office in Warsaw, Poland, 10 April 2016.

Poland’s ruling party calls for new constitution


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Poland’s ruling Law & Justice party is gearing up to mark the 20th anniversary of the country’s modern constitution next year by starting to work on replacing the charter.

As reported by Bloomberg, the party’s co-founder Jaroslaw Kaczynski dug in over the party’s conflict with the Constitutional Tribunal, saying it won’t accept a court that’s putting itself “above the law”.

“We might not find enough support to change the constitution during this term, but it’s time to start the work,” Kaczynski said in Warsaw on May 2. “We can ask Poles if they prefer Poland that we’ve all seen or the one that’s ahead of us.”

Meanwhile, Poland’s Prime Minister Beata Szydlo, whose government has refused to publish a March verdict by the tribunal, said: “We respect the constitution but the constitutional court can’t put itself above the law.  We won’t allow for a court-backed anarchy in Poland.”

As previously reported, however, the European Parliament has warned (in a non-binding resolution last month) that democracy in Poland is in jeopardy by the constitutional standoff, highlighting alarm across Europe over Law & Justice’s push for greater state control. In January, the European Commission launched an unprecedented probe into the Polish government’s democratic behaviour.

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