One in four Europeans finds rape acceptable

MARCELO SAYAO

An activist of the NGO Rio de Paz poses in front of pictures by Marcio Freitas that show models who represent female victims of sexual abuse and of 420 underpants that represent the number of women raped in the country every 72 hours, at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 06 June 2016.

And 15% of Europeans believe that domestic violence is a private matter and the law should keep out of it


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One in four Europeans (27%) finds rape acceptable under certain circumstances.

Physical, sexual or psychological violence is neither uncommon nor necessarily unacceptable in Europe. One in three women in the EU have experienced physical and/or sexual violence since the age of 15, while 10% have experienced sexual harassment or cyberstalking. Researchers have put a price on the effect of violence on labour market participation, health care, and other factors.

The price tag of violence is a whopping €259bn a year.

That is the brief overview of a Eurobarometer study conducted in the EU 28 member States between the 4th and the 13th June 2016. 27,818 respondents were asked engaged.

Perception

Take a look around, because one in four Europeans (27%) think that rape is justified, “sometimes.”

Many Europeans believe that taping your partner is acceptable if they are drunk or on drugs (12%), if they make their way to their place but then don’t want to (11%), or if they don’t “physically fight back (10%).” If you are in Romania, Hungary or Bulgaria, know that rape is more acceptable than in Sweden or Spain.

And there is a widespread belief that women provoke their rapist (20%), or provoke violence in general (17%), and after all, exaggerate the claim they have been raped (22%). 22% agree that women “make them up or exaggerate” claims of abuse or rape, with proportions varying from 47% in Malta to 8% in Sweden.

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Experience

One in four women in the EU has a friend or family member that has been beaten. 75% believe domestic violence against women is common. That is a 4% drop compared to the same study in 2010.

Significantly, 29% believe violence against men is common; that ranges from 61% in the U.K to only 8% in Bulgaria. The divergence is either related to gender identity and the perception of “acceptable violence” or describes a diverging reality.

And while 96% believe violence should be condemned, 15% think the law should stay out of it, as it is a “private matter.”

More than 60% of respondents say domestic violence against women is unacceptable and should always be punishable by law. But, while 90% would agree with this assertion in Portugal, only 64% would agree in Latvia or Slovakia.

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