Now, we have to live with Trump

EPA/ANDREW GOMBERT

Gone with the Wind. Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton (R) and Huma Abedin (L) at the end of the final Presidential Debate at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, 19 October 2016.

Now, we have to live with Trump


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Right from the start, a Donald Trump victory was easy to predict. Only those isolated from the bulk of our society and who live in a glass tower could not see it coming. But it was a matter of common sense – that’s all.

Some are protesting, unhappy that Trump had less votes than Hillary – but it’s not the first time. Others are protesting, citing Trump’s sexist, misogynistic, homophobic, isolationist, and ignorant comments made and revealed during the campaign. The people standing up against these statements are doing so in fear that Trump will become the Hitler of the 21st Century, and it is the job of politicians, media, and citizens around the world to act as watchdogs to ensure that this does not happen. The more so that is not in the personality of Donald Trump to become a dictator. He is a deep believer of freedom.

Recent history has shown that many leaders who make hard statements in a campaign end up discarding their previous rhetoric when they come to power, and my prediction is that this will be the case. After all, in a democracy as strong as America’s, there is no other option that would allow for his political survival otherwise. Trump’s victory speech shows that he has already taken the first steps in this direction.

Is it hypocritical to accept that candidate Trump said things which society should not stand for, and which President-Elect Trump will likely not stand for either, now that he has won? Yes, but as the US Ambassador to the EU said the morning after the election, “A lot of things are said during a campaign…”

If people had believed he was truly dangerous, then more would have turned up to vote instead of less.

Trump promised change, and the American people gave him their vote. Trump’s victory was a victory of the ordinary people against the conventional establishment and against hypocrisy. It was also a victory against the dictatorship of the administration, which rose after the collapse of the dictatorship of the proletariat.

It was a victory of the people along Main Street against a small group of corrupt rulers, pseudo-intellectuals and decadent celebrities, media-coined political leaders and smart financiers who use the inner circles of the administration and who have been leading the middle class to depletion.

On a Woman President

A small note on the ‘glass ceiling’ and Hillary Clinton, whose concession speech, came a day too late and disappointed voters who had spent hours on end waiting for the electoral result and to see their leader. Clinton’s speech was drowned in bitter denial. America shattered one invisible barrier by electing Barack Obama into office not once, but twice. Americans were, and have been ready to elect a woman president for a long time.

It was Hillary Clinton that was not good enough; as a candidate – not as a woman, and not because she is a woman. Her message to young women in her speech to ‘believe in themselves’, and that America will get there one day, would have been more encouraging if she had recognised that America was indeed ready, and it was already there, but it had not voted for her. Her personal confession of loss would have been the nations, empowering, gain.

What is the EU doing?

It would be a big mistake for Europeans, and for this wonderful chance for peaceful change, to credit Trump’s victory to the far-right or the Russians. Donald Trump is the new President-Elect of the United States since the moment he passed the 270 electoral vote minimum.

At that moment the three leaders of the European Union Jean-Claude Juncker, Donald Tusk and Martin Schulz should have sent a join telegram with four words, “congratulations, we are coming,” and take the first plane to America. This is politics.

Instead, they let Marine Le Pen to be the first to congratulate and celebrate, and let the Russians to quasi monopolize the victory of Trump. In addition, the first cable from the Commission to EU’s ambassadors around the world the next morning, was to dictate silence and prohibit any comment on the American election result. Martin Schulz sent a negative message to Trump, trying to leverage the opportunity for what he perceives will give him political benefit. The other two presidents, Juncker and Tusk, sent a formal letter of congratulations.

This can be seen as a total failure as the Presidents of the European Union’s Institutions offered the victory of Donald Trump, as a free gift, to Europe’s far right.

At the same time, it is a unique opportunity for Trump to become a more accepted figure. If he seizes the opportunity to take initiative and distance himself from political figures belonging on the fringes of the spectrum, he will have taken an important step in solidifying his position as President of the Unites States of America on the world stage.

Whether Donald Trump will be capable of meeting the expectations of the American people and the world is irrelevant. Societies are like mammoths. When they start running, nothing can stop them and nothing can make them change direction. If Trump fails to deliver, others will instead.

Trump became President of the United States against all odds. The two conventional parties were against this result, and they both lost. The Democrats lost because they lost the election. The Republicans lost because Trump did not run as a Republican. He literarily hijacked the Republican Party amidst a political vacuum. He is not as religious as the average Republican and politically he could be easily classified as a centre-leftist, definitely not as a right-winger.

In America, the new French Revolution came peacefully. If we do not follow the wind of change blowing from the other side of the Atlantic, the one and only chance we have will be lost and the worst will come.

Most probably sooner rather than later.

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