No new secret CIA jails in Poland, Lithuania

EPA/TOMASZ WASZCUK

A picture made available 25 July 2014 shows the barbwired fence and a sign warning from entering the military base in Stare Kiejkuty, Poland, 24 July 2014. The European Court of Human Rights on 24 July ruled on that Poland had violated the European Convention on Human Rights by allowing the CIA to detain two suspects on the Polish territory.

No new secret CIA jails in Poland, Lithuania


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The United States would not be allowed to locate new secret prisons on their soil if President Donald Trump decides to reinstate an old CIA programme that detained and interrogated terrorism suspects abroad, according to Poland and Lithuania.

As reported by the Reuters news agency, both eastern European countries are close allies of the US and hosted now-defunct “black site” jails that were used during President George W. Bush‘s “war on terrorism” after the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, in New York.

According to US officials, Trump may order a review that could lead to the restoration of programme. Similar facilities, where interrogation techniques often condemned as torture were used, were located in Romania, Thailand and Afghanistan.

“There is no proposal for that and there is no room [for talks],” Polish Prime Minister Beata Szydlo told journalists, when asked if her government would agree to such prisons. “My answer is no.”

In an interview with Reuters, Lithuania’s foreign affairs minister, Linas Linkevicius said: “Torturing of people is not possible according to international law, code of conduct – not just legally but morally.  I do not believe that any civilised state should apply these methods. It’s not just my personal position, it’s the position of my state.”

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