A New Commodity: Polish Cybersecurity

THIERRY ROGE

(L-R) European Commissioner in charge of the Digital Agenda, Neelie Kroes, European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs Catherine Ashton and EU Commissioner for Home Affairs Cecilia Malmstroem address a joint news conference on Cyber security strategy at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, 07 February 2013. The European Commission, together with the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, has published a cybersecurity strategy alongside a Commission proposed directive on network and information security (NIS). The cybersecurity strategy represents the EU's comprehensive vision on how best to prevent and respond to cyber disruptions and attacks.

Poland could become a global leader in cybersecurity, given state support and investment, the Kosciuszko Institute’s latest report says.


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What's This?

In its 2016 report, the Kosciuszko Institute concluded that Poland could become an international leader in the sector of cybersecurity, counting on state support. The Institute is a polish non-profit NGO research institute that specialises in the development of apolitical reports and recommendations on public policies for policy makers. It has as consistent patrons the Polish government and much of Europe, as well as the European Union and NATO.

Poland Has the Ideal Elements to Become a Leader in the Industry

Conclusions indicate that Poland’s potential, regarding cybersecurity products and services, would create a solid market asset in polish economy based on that sector. It would become a pillar for the country’s economy, solidifying it and making it an international reference, and it would increase security for Poland and its industry. Cybersecurity, in a global market valued at € 107 billion and on the rise, could become Poland’s competitive export goods.

“Poland has the potential to develop a strong cyber security sector. The nature of the Polish economy enables the development of a national specialization in that field. However, this requires a coordinated and well-thought commitment of the state,” said Dominik Skokowski, expert of the Kosciuszko Institute and the editor of the report.

According to the report, Poland’s potential to lead in the sector is demonstrated in the increased value if the domestic information and communication technology (ICT) market. In 2016, said market reached beyond € 7.5 billion, while the country’s universities continue to graduate IT degrees at a rate of 30,000 a year.

Furthermore, cybersecurity, as a form of safety that can be purchased, is gaining an increasing role as a commodity, creating a market based on needs and wanting which can be optimally tapped. As pointed out in the report, it is not merely a cost, it can generate revenue when invested in properly.

The Polish Government Plays a Crucial Role

Acknowledging the optimal setting for the development of cybersecurity in the state, the 2016 report by the institute points out that, in order to make use of that potential, support from the state itself would be pivotal.

In Poland, the state is recommended to provide a friendly environment for domestic companies, in terms of institutions and regulations, and allow them to increase competitiveness, while encouraging their expansion abroad. Support from the government is required in every step, from the creation of a national strategy to the designing of programs.

“A business success of domestic companies is not only a benefit for their owners and employees, but also for all citizens. In addition, these companies make a significant contribution to the state budget,” said Zdzisław Wiater, Director of the Military Division in Asseco Poland.

“Currently, Poland can use the enormous potential of domestic IT companies, which have gained experience over the last 25 years, to build a strong position of our economy and increase the security of our country and its key sectors,” added Wiater.

Other countries, which have been internationally identified as leaders in cybersecurity, have implemented that strategy. Israel, for instance, made use of state involvement and public-private collaboration, and has reached revenues in the sector at € 3.3 billion, 1% of its entire GDP. Furthermore, Britain’s export values in the sector are estimated at € 1,7 billion, using the same strategy.

Similar recommendations have been made to the EU as a whole, with emphasis on international cooperation, harmonisation of regulations and the development of partnerships between developers and the public sector.

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