Three new public opinion surveys published on Thursday suggest the far-left candidate, Jean-Luc Melenchon, is gaining ground against front-runners Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen. For Melenchon, the challenge is 2% and ten days to go. And the results of the French elections can affect Europe profoundly.

In all three surveys published on Thursday – Ipsos, Harris, and Ifop Fiducial – the far-left Presidential candidate is 2-to-3,5% behind the frontrunners. Melenchon’s appeal is between 19-20%, up from 15-18% the last week of March.

Meanwhile, the Emmanuel Macron has passed his peak in the first week of April and is now in the region of 22-to-24% and is now in a virtual tie with the far-right leader of Front National.

Melenchon biggest pool of voters is the Socialist Party, as the leftist Benoit Hamon has been abandoned by high ranking members of the Francois Hollande administration, who are rallying behind the independent liberal centrist – and former Economy Minister – Emmanuel Macron. All three surveys make abundantly clear that the Socialist Party candidate had seen his 18-to-21% peak in late February – when a joint ticket with

All three surveys make abundantly clear that the Socialist Party candidate has seen his peak in  late February, when a joint ticket with Melanchon was rumored. At the time, Hamon reached 18-to21% on the polls. The tables have now turned and Melanchon is in the lead, drugging away his voters. He is now seeing his support tumble to single digits, that is, in the region of 7,5%-to-8,5%.

All three surveys make abundantly clear that the Socialist Party candidate had seen his 18-to-21% peak in late February – when a joint ticket with Melanchon was rumored. He is now seeing his support tumble to single digits, that is, in the region of 7,5%-to-8,5%.

Melenchon is a former Lionel Jospin cabinet minister (2000-2002) who founded the Left Party in 2014. He is currently scoffing his pronouncement as a “French Chavez,” but the possibility of a far-French versus far-right second round in France has spooked financial analysts.

In March, Benoit Hammon and Jean-Luc Melenchon considered joining a common ballot, an idea that attracted 25,5% to 29% of the electorate. What happened then is being repeated now. Economic analysts assume that a far-left Alliance increases the odds of a Le Pen victory. That is because fewer voters of the traditional right would be willing to vote for the far-left in the second round. But, more voters of the traditional left find him less threatening.

epa05901268 A composite combo photo shows the official campaign posters for all eleven candidates for the 2017 French presidential election candidates, including (clockwise from top left): 'Debout La France' (Stand Up France) political party candidate Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, 'Front National' (FN) political party candidate Marine Le Pen, 'En Marche!' (Onward!) political party candidate Emmanuel Macron, 'Parti Socialist' (PS) political party candidate Benoit Hamon, 'Lutte Ouvriere' (Workers' Struggle) political party candidate Nathalie Arthaud, 'Nouveau Parti Anticapitaliste (NPA)' (New anticapitalist Party) political party Philippe Poutou, 'Solidarite et Progres (Solidarity and Progress) political party Jacques Cheminade, The official campaign poster for 2017 French presidential election independent candidate Jean Lassalle, 'La France Insoumise' (Undefeated France) candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon, 'Union Populaire Republicain' (Popular Republican Union) political party candidate Francois Asselineau, and 'Les Republicains' (LR) political party Francois Fillon, seen in Paris, France, 10 April 2017. The French presidential election is scheduled for 23 April and 07 May 2017. EPA/IAN LANGSDON
A composite combo photo shows the official campaign posters for all eleven candidates for the 2017 French presidential election candidates, including (clockwise from top left): ‘Debout La France’ (Stand Up France) political party candidate Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, ‘Front National’ (FN) political party candidate Marine Le Pen, ‘En Marche!’ (Onward!) political party candidate Emmanuel Macron, ‘Parti Socialist’ (PS) political party candidate Benoit Hamon, ‘Lutte Ouvriere’ (Workers’ Struggle) political party candidate Nathalie Arthaud, ‘Nouveau Parti Anticapitaliste (NPA)’ (New anticapitalist Party) political party Philippe Poutou, ‘Solidarite et Progres (Solidarity and Progress) political party Jacques Cheminade, The official campaign poster for 2017 French presidential election independent candidate Jean Lassalle, ‘La France Insoumise’ (Undefeated France) candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon, ‘Union Populaire Republicain’ (Popular Republican Union) political party candidate Francois Asselineau, and ‘Les Republicains’ (LR) political party Francois Fillon, seen in Paris, France, 10 April 2017. The French presidential election is scheduled for 23 April and 07 May 2017. EPA/IAN LANGSDON