Italy postpones citizenship law for second generation migrants

GIUSEPPE LAMI

Italy's Northern League senators protest the Italian government's 'ius soli' immigrant children citizenship bill, by holding placards reading 'Stop invasion', in Rome, Italy, 15 June 2017. The controversial bill grants 'ius soli' ('law of the soil' in Latin) citizenship rights to children born on Italian soil from immigrant parents.

Italy postpones citizenship law for second generation migrants


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The Italian government will not try to pass a citizenship bill for second generation migrants, Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni said on Sunday.

The citizenship law is opposed by members of Gentiloni’s Democratic Party’s (PD) as well as parts of the opposition, especially the far-right Lega Nord. The draft bill would grant citizenship by the age of 12 to all children born in Italy to non-Italian parents and educated for five years in Italy.

The summer session takes place in a negative context, as thousands of immigrants try to make the journey from Libya to Italy. In the Prime Minister’s view, the law is just and he remains personally committed to passing it in the autumn session. However, critics have undermined the bill by proposing 48,000 amendments.

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