Italy Aims to Protect Durum Wheat Subsidies

Italy Aims to Protect Durum Wheat Subsidies


Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+

The European Commission’s plan to reduce durum wheat subsidises recently incited the anger of the Italian government, which told Agriculture Commissioner Franz Fischler to forget about the plan as it could put a huge dent in the country’s staple. “The matter of durum wheat is a fundamental one for Italy and we are not going to accept cuts,” Italian Agriculture Minister Gianni Alemanno told reporters. The minister stressed how important it was to ensure pasta’s key ingredient when Italy met with Fischler concerning the new Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). At their recent dinner meeting, Alemanno made certain that the Austrian official ate an assortment of food made from durum wheat. The European Union has said that it would like to set up an inexpensive system and alter the current system to ensure that no one overproduces their goods. Ideally, this should be panned out before the enlargement process for the candidate countries comes to fruition. The commissioner, who visited Rome last in a series of tours to European capitals, said the plan to modify the CAP, worth 40 billion Euros, will eliminate an age-old link between what farmers produce and the funding they receive. To date, as the Mediterranean state yields 3.5 million tonnes of durum wheat, it receives 345 Euros per hectare (2.5 acres) in subsidies under the current CAP regulations, which brings the figure to 552 million Euros. Alemanno said, “It’s a fundamental issue for Italy not only because the reform will cut Italy’s share of the budget, but because it could lead to a transfer of durum wheat production, and related pasta production, to other countries, and that would be intolerable.” Based on Fischler’s plan, the subsidy for Italy would drop from 345 Euros to 250 Euros per acre. “The matter is still open,” the commissioner told a news conference. (641)

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+