IKEA suffers political onslaught in Poland as it takes a stand on homophobia

The view on the newly opened new, automated module - Customer Distribution Center of the Swedish firm IKEA at the Distribution Center in Jarosty, central Poland, 11 January 2018. EPA-EFE/Grzegorz Michalowski POLAND OUT

IKEA suffers political onslaught in Poland as it takes a stand on homophobia


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Party (PiS) campaigning with a poster featuring an umbrella protecting the nucleus family.

Among the man’s posts was Leviticus 20:13, a popular reference point for religious condemnation of homosexuality, as it calls for the death penalty for anyone committing adultery, incest, and homosexuality: “If a man lies with a male as with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination; they shall surely be put to death; their blood is upon them.”

The Polish man used his personal social media account to post texts from the Book of Leviticus and Matthew’s Gospel during a day of solidarity with the LGBT community last May 16. Tomasz K is objecting to his firing evoking freedom of speech and freedom of belief.

 “I wanted to . . . sell furniture, this is what my contract was about. I don’t think that [implementing LGBT values] is part of my duties,” he said in a statement in an interview with TVP.

The man is receiving wide support from Catholic bishops, who have congratulated the man for his courage.

“From the point of view of the law and above all of propriety and common sense, it is unacceptable to attack the Ikea employee who refused LGBT indoctrination in the workplace,” said the Polish episcopate in a statement.

The Ordo Iuris Institute for Legal Culture is taking Ikea to court on behalf of Tomasz K.

The minister of Justice, Zbigniew Ziobro, argued that this is a case of a foreign company discriminating against a Pole with Catholic values, “protected by Polish law that guarantees freedom of conscience and religion to every citizen,” making reference to legal and economic violence.

Zbioro launched an official investigation, while the leader of PiS, Jaroslaw Kaczynski, raised the stakes by referring to a threat by the LGBT movement against “Polish identity.”

IKEA has responded by repeating company policy, which requires the guarantee of a safe working space for individuals regardless of gender, sexual orientation and gender identity, age, nationality, or religion, reiterating that quotes about the death of homosexuals could undermine a sense of dignity for the LGBT community.

IKEA has been operating in Poland since 1991, where it also produces a wide range of products in 16 factories that export all over the world.

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