ID cards get stronger security features

EPA/Armin Weigel

(FILES) The file picture, dated 28 November 2007, shows a German policeman examining a Belgian passport under a special light at the border crossing Waidhaus, Germany. Starting 21 December 2007 the border controls at the 356km long border between Bavaria and the Czech Republic will be discontinued, as the two new members states Poland and Czech Republic join the Schengen Agreement. This allows for the free flow of people between the two countries once separated by the Iron Curtain.

ID cards get stronger security features


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The EU Council green-lighted on 06 June the Commission’s proposal to strengthen the security of identity and residence documents. The ID cards will have their security features aligned with those of passports, with a contactless chip with the holder’s photo and fingerprints.
The reason for this regulation is that some national authorities still use paper ID cards, that can easily be falsified and used by terrorists and other criminals to enter the EU.
To speed up border checks, residence cards for third-country family members of EU citizens living in another EU country will also be in a uniform format.

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