Household electricity prices in the EU increased says Eurostat

EPA/MAURITZ ANTIN

A file photo dated 02 March 2012 shows the building of the European Central Bank (ECB) reflected in the Euro sign logo by artist Otmar Hoerl in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. The eurozone pulled out of its longest-ever recession in the second quarter, powered ahead by a stronger-than-forecast pickup up in the region's two biggest economies - Germany and France, the European Union's statistics office Eurostat said 14 August 2013. The 17-member eurozone economy grew by 0.3 per cent in the three months to June after six consecutive quarters of contraction. This beat the forecasts of analysts, who had been expecting the currency bloc to expand by a slightly more modest 0.2 per cent. However, four eurozone states remain stuck in recession as their governments attempt to patch up state finances against the backdrop of fiscal austerity and high unemployment.

Household electricity prices in the EU increased says Eurostat


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Eurostat, the statistical office of the EU published the latest statistics about the energy prices.
On average, household electricity prices in the EU increased to €21.1 per 100 kWh (+3.5%), between the second half of 2017 and the second half of 2018.
The average household electricity price was only €0.1 per 100 kWh higher than in the second half of 2015, the former peak in the last ten years.
Across the EU, household electricity prices in the second half of 2018 ranged from €10 per 100 kWh in Bulgaria to around €30 per 100 kWh in Denmark, Germany and Belgium.
For more information visit the official website.

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