Greeks live by the sword and die by the sword

EPA

The Greek case has veered off course, and is likely to have an unhappy ending.


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The raw deal

The ‘Institutions’ have managed to put the new Greek government on its toes, forcing it to draw new lines in the sand in order to accept a new agreement. The most recent Eurogroup meeting has shown that both sides are looking to find solutions and to “bridge the gaps”.

Yet, what is most worrisome, is that a new ‘deal’, will likely be made on terms which are unsustainable, and most burdensome to the very layers of Greek society that have carried Greece through this financial crisis and suffered most.

This will signify the catastrophe of Greece’s social and economic structures, and with or without Grexit, a controlled consolidation of the Eurozone. More importantly, it will lead to the marginalization of all ‘unconventional’ leftist movements in Europe which until now in many countries, according to opinion polls, were surging.

 

The promises and woes of the left

Before the January 2015 Greek election, Pablo Iglesias, the leader of the Spanish unconventional leftist party Podemos, appeared in the pre-election rally of Syriza in Omonia Square in Athens next to Alexis Tsipras (the leftist winner of the Greek election) shouting the last tweet of Hugo Chaves, “Venceremos, hasta la victoria siempre.”

Alexis Tsipras won the election in Greece and is now the Prime Minister. The left movements in all European countries associated their future with the then brilliant-looking present of Syriza. Tsipras won promising that he will erase the Greek debt giving an end to five years of recession and abuse by the European pimps. The Greeks believed, and the European meta-communist left believed that this is the solution.

In late 2014, while leftist parties in Europe were on the rise, polls showed “Podemos” as a leading party in Spain. Similar was the rise of leftist parties all over Europe like the “Parti de Gauche” under Jean-Luc Melenchon in France and the “Movimento 5 Stelle” under Beppe Grillo in Italy. Today, after the total defeat (or surrender) of Greece on the European front, Podemos struggles to maintain third place in Spanish polls, while analogous is the decline of similar parties in the rest of Europe.

SYRIZA: The fifty shades of red

Syriza, a party with inexperienced leaders and consisting of many leftist micro-components, invoking images of “The fifty shades of red”, was an easy target for the old political foxes of Europe who are facing a global crisis. Consequently, Greece has had to be sacrificed in order to control the rise of the left in Europe.

Today’s Europe is based in financial discipline and over-regulation, which extends in all facets of the social, political and financial life of citizens. A victory of Syriza over conservative Europeans would have brought into power similar parties in other European countries. This would have led to uncontrolled, asymmetric changes in all socio-economic structures of the European Union.

At this moment, negotiations, between the Greeks and their partners are in stalemate as both sides have placed red lines in the sand which overlap.

 

Live by the sword and die by the sword

Grexit appears a possibility for both parties. The Greeks live by the sword and die by the sword while the Europeans, Populars, Socialists and Liberals, all what they care is to maintain the conservative status quo of the continent.

Greeks and the Eurozone left two months to pass, doing nothing and letting things in Greece to deteriorate (and the government amass some working experience). In these two months, Greeks have withdrawn their savings, the stock market has tanked, tax collections have seriously declined, a large number of small and medium enterprises have closed, and national and foreign investments have ceased as nobody is willing to invest in the climate of uncertainty in Greece.

All in all, if the ‘Sublime Porte’, for political (and not economic) reasons, has decided to destroy Greece,  the Greeks can do nothing but to “die by the sword.”

Otherwise, if the ‘Sublime Porte’ sincerely looks for a way out, it must stop negotiations, remember that the Eurogroup is not the “coalition of the willing” and Greece the “rogue state” but part of the coalition and thus find a lasting solution.” In this case, once all issues are identified, the solution to the problem will look simple, as long as both parties abandon their red lines – in the sand.

Greece must abandon its socialist fantasies and with a new grand coalition government seek radical change. Growth and development, which means freedom and deregulation. This is the answer to the Greek quest; not more taxes to a starved people.

Europeans, if they want to assist Greece as an old member of the coalition, must abandon their fixed ideas to get the Greeks pay more taxes. The Greeks have no more money. Europeans have to accept a significant and generous reduction of the Greek debt and give more financial assistance, provided the Greeks are doing what they have to do. Not the socialist way, but the right way.

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