Germany’s liberals draw a red line in-between the Franco-German axis

The leader of Germany's Free Democratic Party (FDP), Christian Lindner, gestures as speaks to supporters at an election campaign event of the Free Democrats (FDP) on the Roemer Square in Frankfurt/Main, Germany, 18 September 2017. General elections in Germany are scheduled for 24 September 2017. EPA-EFE/ARMANDO BABANI

Germany’s liberals draw a red line in-between the Franco-German axis


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Germany’s Free Democrats (FDP) will not allow the political and economic integration of the Eurozone, Christian Lindner asserted on Sunday.

Lidner told Welt am Sonntag that FDP draws a red line against any form of social transfer or debt mutualization on a European level, be it in the form of a Eurozone budget or a banking union.

What’s more, if there is already an agreement with President Emmanuel Macron and Chancellor Angela Merkel, the FDP will not allow it to come to fruition.

That means the FDP is also unwilling to heed Macron’s demand for a finance minister of the Eurozone. Given the Chancellor’s public commitment to working with President Macron for the reform of the Eurozone, an alliance with FDP less likely.

In addition, FDP has been campaigning for the expulsion of Greece from the Eurozone.

With a double-digit lead in the polls, there is little doubt the Christian Democrats are headed for a convincing victory on September 24. The composition of the ruling coalition is now the central political question. Since the end of the Second World War, the traditional party of business has been regarded a “natural ally” for Christian Democratic governments. However, that alliance is becoming increasingly more difficult as FDP demands absolute control over the economy.

However, that alliance is becoming increasingly more difficult. As a  junior coalition partner, FDP will demand absolute control over the economy, domestically and on a European level.

On Monday, Alexander Hahn told Bild that FDP will only join a coalition in which it can name the finance minister. The member of the party’s national executive is well aware that removing Wolfgang Schaeuble from the post will be exceedingly difficult for  Angela Merkel. At the same time, Schaeuble has been the staunchest opponent of debt mutualization and social transfers whilst also advocating Grexit on more than one occasion.

At the same time, Schaeuble has been the staunchest opponent of debt mutualization and social transfers whilst also advocating Grexit on more than one occasion.

The alternative for the Christian Democrats is to seek, once again, a broad coalition with the Social Democrats (SPD), which is rating 23% on the polls. SPD is willing to heed Macron’s demands and have signaled their willingness to discuss debt mutualization.

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