Germany’s far-right AfD loses in polls

EPA/SASCHA DITSCHER

Frauke Petry, Federal Chairwoman of the German party Alternative for Germany (AfD), speaks during a conference of European right-wing party ENF, Europe Nations and Freedom, in Koblenz, Germany, 21 January 2017.

Germany’s far-right AfD loses in polls


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For the first time in months, polls in Germany show the far-right AfD party is falling below double digits, while Angela Merkel’s party remains in the lead.

The poll, conducted by the Institute Allensbach and newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, asked participants who they would vote.

As reported by The Local, the AfD received just 8.5% of the theoretical vote – the first time they have dropped below double digits in the Allensbach poll since last July, and the worst level of support since December 2015 when they fell to 8%.

Another poll on February 22 by Forsa research group, RTL and Stern magazine also showed the AfD’s support to be waning, with the party receiving just 8% support. This was a drop from 12% within just four weeks.

“At the moment the AfD can barely gain any points with their strategy to capture voters through the refugee crisis. Furthermore the chaotic administration of US President Donald Trump, which they celebrated at first, is now causing concern given flash points across the world,” Forsa researcher Manfred Güllner told Stern.

According to The Local, the Allensbach poll also showed Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservative parties (CDU/CSU) to be at the forefront with 33% support. They were followed closely at 30.5 percent by the Social Democrats (SPD), whose chancellor candidate Martin Schulz is hoping to upset Merkel’s bid for a fourth term in power.

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