France proposes Lille for EU drug agency after Brexit

EPA/THIBAULT VANDERMERSCH

France proposes Lille for EU drug agency after Brexit


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France proposed the northern city of Lille as a candidate to host the European Union’s drug regulator to replace London after Britain leaves the EU.

Lyon, Montpellier, Nice, Paris Sud-Villejuif and Toulouse were among the French cities vying to become the agency’s new home.

However, Francois Hollande, President of the Republic and the prime minister Bernard Cazeneuve chose Lille as the place best suited for the job.

The European Medicines Agency (EMA), Europe’s equivalent of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, is preparing to leave its London headquarters in the wake of Brexit and its executive director is hoping for a quick decision on its new location.

The agency is responsible for the smooth-running of the EU drug approval process, which is vital for companies, as well as overseeing the safety of medicines once they reach the market.

With nearly 900 staff, an annual budget of 322 million euros and luring 36,000 experts a year to its meetings, the EMA is the largest EU institution in Britain and an attractive prospect for multiple cities.

The European Commission dismissed a suggestion from Britain this week that the EMA and another EU agency, the European Banking Authority (EBA), might not have to leave London.

Countering Britain’s suggestion that their relocation was “subject to the exit negotiations”, a spokesman said it was not and that they would be moved so that they remain on EU territory.

In a statement issued by the office of the French Prime minister, the government praised Lille’s location in western Europe as the city is close to Brussels, London and Paris.

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