France and Britain reach bilateral border security deal

THIBAULT VANDERMERSCH

Children offer flowers to police during a peaceful demonstration against the demolition of the migrant camp known as the 'Jungle' in Calais, France, 07 March 2016. French authorities continued to clear part of Calais' sprawling migrant camp, whose population surged to approximately 6,000 last year. They are trying to encourage migrants to seek asylum in France.

France and Britain reach bilateral border security deal


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An Anglo-French bilateral border security treaty was concluded on Thursday, focusing on the prolonged migrant crisis in Calais.

Talks between President Emmanuel Macron and Prime Minister Theresa May were concluded at the Sandhurst military, southwest of London.

According to Mrs. May, the treaty is aligned with the principles of the 2003 Le Touquet agreement, which essentially allows the UK to push the management of migration flows from British to French territory. The two parties aim to reduce the time third country migrants wait for their applications for visa or asylum to be processed: the objective is to reduce the time needed to process an application for the UK from six to one month for adults and 25 days for children.

{The treaty} will “enable us both to have a more humane approach to these people and to be more efficient,” Macron told the BBC.

The UK has pledged an additional €50 million euros to bolster border security in France and will fund anything from fencing to CCTV and detection technology. For the Prime Minister Theresa May this means she does not have to add migratory pressure to her long list of Brexit hurdles. For President Macron the Treaty means he can deliver on investment in the Port of Calais, improving conditions for local residents.

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