Former Cambridge Analytica boss admits receiving Facebook data

Cambridge Analytica's sign at their offices in London, Britain, 21 March 2018. EPA-EFE/ANDY RAIN

Former Cambridge Analytica boss admits receiving Facebook data


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Cambridge Analytica’s former boss, Alexander Nix, admitted the company received data from Facebook on Wednesday.

Cambridge Analytica reportedly illegally secured access to the personal data of 87 million users. The data was leaked by researcher Alksandr Kogan; after his admission that he did pass on the data to Cambridge Analytica, Nix retracted his version of events to admit his company did receive Facebook-generated data.

 “Of course, the answer to this question should have been ‘yes,’” Nix said to a UK House of Commons committee investigation fake news.

The data in question was harvested by Kogan via an app that mined personal information of 270,000 users – and their connections – which he then sold. Facebook claims that Kogan violated its policy.

Allegedly, the database was used during the Trump Presidential campaign and the UK’s 2016 Leave campaign. Nix accepts the role of Cambridge Analytica in the Trump campaign but not in the Leave campaign.

Nix claims the data has since been deleted; he also claims that the company’s whistleblower Christopher Wylie is lying about Cambridge Analytica’s role in the EU referendum campaign.

The former boss of Cambridge Analytica was embroiled in the scandal during a Channel 4 documentary in the UK, in which he was seen boasting about the company’s instrumentality in election President Trump. During the documentary in which reporters posed as potential clients, Mr Nix took pride in campaign practices such as blackmail, trapping individuals by making video recordings of illegal offers or using “some girls” to compromise candidates.

Mr. Nix said on Wednesday that he feels victimized by the way he was portrayed in the documentary and that his statements were just a sales pitch taken out of context. Channel 4 says the documentary conveyed all of Mr. Nix’s statements in context.

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