Finnish logging lobby celebrates victory in the European Parliament

Commercial handout image released by Wild Taiga on 27 June 2008.Wild Taiga, a group of 45 small tourism enterprises, offers refreshment and recreation for body and soul. Well-being the Finnish way is seen as a comprehensive experience, fresh air and out-door activities combined with good and healthy food, based on local ingredients from the farms and forests. The cuisine in this part of the world bears elements from both western and eastern cultural spheres. Relatively new for the ordinary tourist, but exciting and interesting, wildlife watching is fast becoming a popular pastime for visitors to Northern Finland. WILD TAIGA EPA COMMERCIAL FEED EDITORIAL USE ONLY

From humble beginnings just a few years ago this unique opportunity is now available in many places, especially in the North-Eastern region of Kainuu. So much so that Wild Taiga, offering a combination of wildlife watching and other outdoor activities supported by an insight into local heritage and traditions plus a world-class chamber music festival, recently won the title of Finland?s emerging tourist destination of excellence in the European Commission project Destinations of Excellence.

Finnish logging lobby celebrates victory in the European Parliament


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Finnish parliamentary lobbying to amend a climate change directive and allow more logging was successful on Wednesday in Strasbourg, the public broadcaster yle reports.

The Land Use Change and forestry regulation directive initially envisaged a cap to the use of forestry to the levels reached from 1990 to 2009. The objective was to create a long term repository for carbon, so as to neutralize emissions.

Europe’s forests absorb 10% of Europe’s carbon emissions every year.

The amendment introduced on Wednesday provides a more flexible approach to logging, allowing an increase in commercial activity so long as the forests’ carbon storing ability remains the same or grows by 2050.

The Finnish Green Party has rejected the amendment as a “setback” in the fight against climate change. The EU’s Council of Ministers is likely to approve Wednesday’s vote and amend the directive in October.

Finland in recent years is breaking every record in logging and plans to increase production by 23% by 2030.

Last year (2015-2016) Finland logged 58.5 million cubic metres of roundwood removed from its forests for commercial use, that is, 12% than the past decade average. 60 million cubic metres is equivalent to 100 million trees or 1,500 square kilometres of land area.

In a public statement published in March 2017, 68 Finnish environmental scientists warned their government that its policy decreases the ability of forests to cool the climate and increases emissions. However, caught in a negative spiral of unemployment and recession, Finland is banking on this traditional sector to boost its economy.

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