Finland’s Green Party goes nuclear

EPA/MARKKU OJALA

Good old time: Anti-nuclear activists, some dressed as nuclear waste barrels, gather around a 'Monument to selfishness' in front of the Finnish Parliament House in Helsinki, Finland, on 01 July 2010.

Finland’s Green Party goes nuclear


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Finland’s Green Party may still be officially anti-nuclear, but its members are no longer opposing nuclear power.

Well over a hundred election candidates from all the major parties – the Greens included – signed a petition calling for feasibility studies for nuclear district heating to provide heat for Finnish cities.

According to Forbes’s contributor James Conca, the Green Party was a major winner in these Finnish elections, taking over 12% of the total vote, the largest share in the Party’s history. The Green Party is now the largest party in Jyväskylä, a medium-sized university city, is almost tied for second in Helsinki and Turku, and is third in Tampere – four of the seven largest cities in Finland.

With 8,000 seats in 311 municipalities up for grabs, the Green Party actually gained seats, and gained majorities in a few municipal councils of many smaller localities, another first for a party mostly supported by urban voters, making them a truly national political movement.

What is more, the gains in the Green Party may cause other parties to reassess nuclear power particularly since strong pro-nuclear candidates were elected.

As for the cost of Finland’s nuclear waste repository, it is estimated to be $3.5bn for a total waste inventory of 2,100 cubic metres.

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