European Parliament votes for a ban on glyphosate by 2022

STEPHANIE LECOCQ

People gather and symbolically topple a giant bottle of 'Glyphosate' by US-based agrochemical company Monsanto to protest the use of the herbicide, in front of the seat of the European Commission at the Berlaymont building in Brussels, Belgium, 19 July 2017. The protest was held in the context of a debate within the European institutions, on whether or not to ban 'Glyphosate', a braodband hebicide which some scientists regard as being highly carcinogenic.

European Parliament votes for a ban on glyphosate by 2022


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The European Parliament approved a resolution to fully ban glyphosates by 2022 on Tuesday.

Glyphosate is the active agent of Monsanto’s weed killer Roundup. On Wednesday, the European Commission postponed taking a binding agreement on the matter, Reuters reports.

Glyphosate is a herbicide used to kill broadleaf plants and grasses since 1974. According to a 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) study the agent has carcinogenic potential as it affects the human endocrinal system.

It has been suggested that Roundup contains many more chemical agents that multiply the toxicity of glyphosate. Traces of the substance have also Ben & Jerry’s ice cream in France, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK, DW reports.

The European Commission had recommended a gradual phase off of the substance within ten years. France opposed the European Commission’s intention to renew the license for the distribution of glyphosate in August. The French decision blocked Monsanto’s licensing process, as a qualified majority of EU member states is required to renew the weed killer’s 10-year license.

The non-binding European Parliament decision mounts pressure on the European Commission to ban the substance. A petition calling for an immediate ban was signed by 13 million citizens and had the support of a number of civil society organizations.

Monsanto’s license for Roundup expires at the end of 2017. Until Tuesday, DW reports that the European Commission was considering a five to seven years license renewal.

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