Europe grounds Boeing 737 Max fleet

EPA-EFE//JUSTIN LANE

Europe grounds Boeing 737 Max fleet


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Europe’s Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) issued a ban on flights of Boeing’s 737-8 and 737-9 Max planes on 12 March after an Ethiopian Air flight crashed on 10 March, killing all 157 of the passengers onboard.

National regulators in China, Germany, France, the UK, Ireland, Australia, Singapore, and Malaysia have grounded their Boeing’s 737 Max fleets in the wake of the crash, which came only five months after another deadly incident that

The fatal crash was the second in less than five months involving Boeing’s newest version of the 737 after a Lion Air Max 8 jet went down Oct. 29 over the Java Sea, killing all 189 people on board.

In Europe, Norwegian Air is the most deeply affected of the national flag carriers as it has one of the biggest fleets of 737-8 planes.

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) continue to insist that the aircraft is safe, noting that there is no concrete evidence to link Sunday’s Ethiopian Airlines crash to the Lion Air tragedy.

The largest operator of 737 Max 8 is the US is the regional carrier, Southwest Airlines, which offered its passengers to reschedule their flight to other routes served by a different Boeing model.

Boeing says it remains committed to rolling out its “flight control software enhancement” as demanded by the FAA. The company’s stock value has seen $27 billion wiped out. Until this week, the Max 8 was Boeing’s most successful launch in the company’s history after having sold more than 5,000 aircraft since 2017.

 

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