EU Parliament delegation goes to Myanmar, as evidence of genocide spreads

Reuters

EU Parliament delegation goes to Myanmar, as evidence of genocide spreads


Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+
The Human Rights Subcommittee of the European Parliament will visit Myanmar next week and go to the border with Bangladesh to gain a first-hand impression of current developments in the region.

This comes after a Reuters report on a recent massacre in Myanmar brought calls for an independent probe.

The delegation includes Members of the Foreign Affairs and International Trade committees and EU-ASEAN delegation. They will visit Rohingya camps and meet international NGOs working in the Rakhine State, Myanmar civil society organisations, religious and political leaders as well as the media.

The Reuters special report, published overnight, lays out events leading up to the killing of 10 Rohingya men from Inn Din village in Rakhine state who were buried in a mass grave after being hacked to death or shot by Buddhist neighbours and government military.

The Reuters report drew on interviews with Buddhists who confessed to torching Rohingya homes, burying bodies and killing Muslims in what they said was a frenzy of violence triggered when Rohingya insurgents attacked security posts last August.

The account marked the first time soldiers and paramilitary police have been implicated by testimony from security personnel in arson and killings in the north of Rakhine state that the United Nations has said may amount to genocide.

Police arrested two Reuters reporters, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, on Dec. 12 for allegedly obtaining confidential documents relating to Rakhine and have accused them of violating Myanmar’s Official Secrets Act. They are in prison while a court decides if they should be charged under a colonial-era act.

Myanmar’s leader and Nobel Peace Prize Aung San Suu Kyi  is facing international criticism, including from fellow peace prize winner Desmond Tutu, for not doing more to stop what the U.N. says are mass killings, rapes and the burning of villages taking place in Rakhine state. Nearly 690,000 Rohingya have fled their villages and crossed the border of western Myanmar into Bangladesh since August.

That is a turnaround from 1991, when the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded her the prize and praised “her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights”. Once awarded, the prize cannot be withdrawn.

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+