EU Paris climate change objectives: Sweden the best, Poland the worst

GRZEGORZ MICHALOWSKI POLAND OUT

Greenpeace activists project a slogan onto the cooling tower of the brown coal fired Belchatow power plant, in Belchatow, Poland, 09 November 2013. Ecologists demanded power plants like Belchatow to be shut down or to change energy sources into renewable ones. According to Greenpeace, they allege, Belchatow, the country biggest producer of carbon dioxide has largely contributed to the warming of the climate.

EU Paris climate change objectives: Sweden the best, Poland the worst


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Europe is not adequately delivering on the UN climate accord signed in Paris in December 2015. The commitment bindsUN member states to keep the global temperature increase below 2 degrees Celsius.

According to the monitoring agency Carbon Market Watch (ECW), only three countries in Europe are adequately delivering on the Paris climate agreement: Sweden, Germany, and France.

The worst performers are Poland, Romania, Lithuania, Latvia, and Italy.

In the countdown for the Environment Council in June 2017, which will set binding targets for EU member states on Climate Change from 2021 through to 2030, ECW ranks EU member states on their commitment level. The rating focuses on governance, including the quality of legislation, as well as the quality of actions plans and the level of commitment of EU member states.

One of the reasons Sweden is considered the best performer in Europe is that while Stockholm is closing legal loopholes that allow a state to “cheat” by planting trees and buying pollution rights – rather than reducing carbon emissions – it is also moving to adopt more ambitious objectives than those set by the European Commission.

To the contrary, in June 2016, Moody’s noted that Poland is not trying to create an environment conducive to investment in sustainable energy infrastructure, which could undermine energy security as the country is expected to decommission some of its conventional electricity plants.

Poland is one of the biggest producers and consumers of coal in the EU 28, generating 80% of its electricity from the black staff. Being the world’s eighth largest producer of coal, Warsaw also has to consider the 100,000 jobs at stake.

Climate
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