EU dragging its feet in eco-friendly technologies 

EU dragging its feet in eco-friendly technologies 


Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+

Europe is dragging its feet in the use of environment-friendly technologies, the European Commission said May 3, urging businesses to apply eco-innovation in all sectors. The commission also said it would make the EU’s environmental policies “a core objective” in its relations with other countries.
In addition, EU member states would be asked to shift the burden of taxation from labour towards protecting the environment. “Global emissions of greenhouse gases are rising, the loss of biodiversity is not yet under control, pollution is still harming public health and volumes of waste are increasing in Europe,” said EU Environment Commissioner Stavros Dimas
While European industry was the world leader in eco-technologies, environmental innovation in Europe often remained in small niche markets, the commission criticised. But “the state of the environment and climate change call for the take-up of clean and environmentally-friendly innovation on a massive scale,” the EU executive body said in explaining its rationale.
By boosting the use of environmental technologies, sectors such as construction, food and beverages, and public transport could bring about large environmental benefits, the commission said. It is estimated that these industries account for up to 80 percent of all impact on the environment.
However, the commission said that industry efforts would not be enough in promoting green technologies, calling for joint action by the EU and its 27 member states across the board.
“Eco-innovation is a central element in the fight against climate change,” Dimas said. “It is vital that the full capacity for eco-innovation be exploited without delay,” he said, adding: “Only through eco- innovation can we fundamentally change our patterns of production and consumption.”
The EU earlier this year vowed bold action in the fight against climate change, setting a binding target of cutting greenhouse gas emissions by at least 20 percent by 2020, and a 20 percent share of renewables in the bloc’s overall energy consumption, although some environmental groups have said protecting some industries, such as German auto manufacturers, was contradictory to that goal.

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
+