The European Council on 22 May formally adopted four new pieces of EU legislation that redesign the EU electricity market to make it fit for the future.

EU ministers adopted new laws on 22 May, which include a regulation and a directive on electricity which make the EU’s electricity market more interconnected, flexible and consumer-centred. The regulation on risk-preparedness in the electricity sector will ensure the security of electricity supply in crisis situations, the Council said, adding that the package also includes an overhaul of the role and functioning of ACER, the Agency for the Cooperation of Electricity Regulators.

This concludes the remaining elements of the Clean energy for all Europeans package and represents a major step towards completing the Energy Union, delivering on the priorities of the Commission of President Jean-Claude Juncker. As a package, the new rules will reinforce consumer rights, putting them at the heart of the energy transition; they will create growth and green jobs in a modern economy leaving no region and no citizen behind. They will enable the EU to show leadership in the fight against climate change following the Paris Agreement, the European Commission said.

Climate Action and Energy Commissioner Miguel Arias Cañete hailed the completion of the Clean energy for all Europeans package.

“This is the most ambitious set of energy proposals ever presented by the European Commission. It has been adopted in record time with impressive support from the European Parliament and Council. With its completion, we have made the EU’s Energy Union – one of the ten political priorities of the Juncker Commission – a reality. I truly believe it will accelerate the clean energy transition and give all Europeans access to secure, competitive and sustainable energy,” Cañete said.

According to the Commission, the Clean energy for all Europeans package sets the right balance between making decisions at EU, national, and local level. Member States will continue to choose their own energy mix but must meet new commitments to improve energy efficiency and the take-up of renewables in that mix by 2030. For example, the new rules on the electricity market, which have been adopted today, will make it easier for renewable energy to be integrated into the grid, encourage more inter-connections and cross-border trade, and ensure that the market provides reliable signals for future investment, the Commission said.