EU Commission asks member states to prepare themselves for all Brexit negotiation outcomes

EPA-EFE/ANDY RAIN

Anti Brexit campaigners fly EU flags outside the British Houses of Parliament in London, Britain, 18 July 2018.

EU Commission asks member states to prepare themselves for all Brexit negotiation outcomes


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The European Commission is taking a better safe than sorry approach after recent developments in the UK pointed to further delays and uncertainty over Britain’s pending withdrawal from the EU.

Brussels has called on all EU countries to be ready for any outcome in the Brexit negotiations and suggested that any kind of withdrawal could cause serious disruptions.

“While the EU is working day and night for a deal ensuring an orderly withdrawal, the UK’s withdrawal will undoubtedly cause disruption – for example in business supply chains – whether or not there is a deal,” the Commission said after its weekly rendezvous in Brussels.

According to the Commission, the repercussions for citizens, businesses and administrations in both the United Kingdom and the European Union could “range from new controls at the EU’s (new) outer border, to the validity of UK-issued licences, certificates, and authorisations,  as well as the new conditions for data transfers”.

The EU is working hard to reach an agreement on an orderly withdrawal and is looking forward to discussing a framework for the future relationship with the United Kingdom. However, there is no certainty that an agreement will be reached”.

Even if an agreement is reached, the relationship will fundamentally change. “Everybody is concerned needs to be prepared for the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union on 30 March 2019. This Communication is to be seen in the light of the call of the EU27 Leaders to intensify preparedness at all levels and encourages all stakeholders that may be affected by the United Kingdom’s withdrawal to take the necessary preparedness actions and to take them now”.

Possible consequences, according to the communication paper, include disruptions in the aviation industry and difficulties in transferring goods from the UK once they become subject to customs checks. “Drawing up contingency plans for the worst possible outcome is not a sign of mistrust in the negotiations,” writes the Commission publication, that consolidates a total of 68 notices to the private sector and stakeholders, eight of which are focusing on financial services.

An EU official familiar with the issue told New Europe that the financial services notices will remain at the current levels as All notices are being translated into all EU languages.

“Preparing for the withdrawal is not just a matter for EU and national authorities but also for private parties,” says the Aviation safety rules notice, which mentions for example that certificates of air safety issued before the withdrawal date by the competent authorities of the United Kingdom on the basis of the provisions of the Basic Regulation and its implementing rules will no longer be valid as of the withdrawal date in the EU. This includes certificates of airworthiness and permits to fly, pilot licenses, and pilot medical certificates.

The Commission is trying to make stakeholders involved more in the process and raise awareness in the private sector.

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