EU calls for ensuring market rules over Croatia’s energy market

© European Union, 2018 / Photo: Damir Sencar

Croatian Prime Minsiter Andrej Plenković and European Commission Vice President Maroš Šefčovič meet in Zagreb, Croatia, January 30, 2018.

Croatia achieves renewable energy targets


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With 28 percent of Croatia’s energy coming from renewables, the country achieved its national 2020 targets for both renewables and energy efficiency, European Commission Vice-President for the Energy Union Maroš Šefčovič told a conference with Croatian Prime Minister Andrej Plenković on “The New Croatian Energy Strategy” in Zagreb.

Šefčovič visited Croatia on January 29-30 as part of the second Energy Union Tour where he discussed preparation of Croatia’s National Energy and Climate Plan for 2021-30, the development of its internal energy market, and its role in regional energy cooperation, including the Central and South Eastern Europe Energy Connectivity (CESEC) initiative.

Šefčovič told the conference that “the potential of Croatian renewable energy is still far greater than is currently being exploiting. You are enjoying optimal conditions for wind and solar energy for example. And if that’s not enough, your geographic location puts you in a perfect position to trade such renewables across the borders. CESEC is one excellent example of how your sunshine here can power a factory all the way in Ukraine or Moldova!”

The Commission Vice President also noted, “ensuring market rules over Croatia’s energy market – will allow investors the stability they need. That is crucial in order to further develop the Croatian renewables market, it is crucial to give investors access to the market”.

He stressed that a lot more can also be done on building renovations and electrification of the transport system. “These are only a few examples of the many choices that Croatia will need to make in the coming months. That is why it is so important for us in the Commission that we receive the national energy and climate plan as soon as possible (or more realistically, after the summer) but in time for the EU to take a position and be ready for COP24. This will allow us to assess the national plans of each EU country and see that the numbers add up and that collectively we can reach our European targets,” said Šefčovič.

 

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