Erasmus+ breaks records with over 400,000 participants in 2017

EPA / PATRICK SEEGER

Erasmus students take a selfie picture with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker (L) and President of the European Parliament Antonio Tajani (R) after the Erasmus 30th Anniversary celebrations at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, June 13, 2017.

Erasmus+ breaks records with over 400,000 participants in 2017


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According to the Erasmus+ annual report published by the European Commission, 400,000 students and university staff spent time abroad in 2016 – 2017 as part of the European Union’s flagship student exchange programme.

The latest review of one of Brussels’ signature accomplishments in terms of inter-European mobility found that the programme has reached a new level of success in terms of the number of individuals taking part in the exchanges, which give students the opportunity to take part in work placements abroad and for teachers and education staff to attend training courses.

Within the outgoing Multi-annual Financial Framework of 2014-2020, the EU has spent €14.7 billion on Erasmus+, making it possible for more than 1.1 million students and academics to take part. More than 4,000 higher education institutions won mobility grants in 2017, representing a 3% increase over 2016.

The European Commission’s current target goal is to attract 3.7% of young Europeans to the programme in the immediate future – a number that Brussels believes is feasible.

Several non-EU countries have able to take part in the Erasmus+ programme since 2015 under the International Credit Mobility action. Nearly 23,000 grants have been awarded to people from partner countries around the world over the course of the last four years, giving them the chance to visit and study in the EU, while more than 11,000 grants were awarded to European youths to study in partner countries’ universities.

Joint Degrees issued by the 191 partner universities that take part in theErasmus Mundus programme, those institutes of higher learning awarded 149 new projects for capacity building in higher education in regions worldwide. The European Commission also spent over €114.7 million on 39 new degrees in 2017.

The Jean Monnet initiative – named for the 20th-century French political economist and diplomat – supported 238 teaching programmes in the field of EU studies at higher education institutions, university chairs, networks, projects, and associations taking place in 69 countries both inside and outside Europe.

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