Egypt Air tragedy: Egyptian forensic believes an explosion took place on board

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Egypt has dispatched a submarine to search for the flight's black boxes and a French ship joined the international effort to locate the wreckage and search for the plane's data recorders. Ships and planes from Britain, Cyprus, France, Greece and the United States are also taking part in the search for the debris from the aircraft, including the black boxes.

There are many conflicting reports about the facts surrounding the fatal crash. An Egyptian official said that the plane did not change direction as it was suggested by the Greek authorities, while a French station reported that the pilot of the plane had a communication with Egyptian air traffic controllers just before the crash. Egyptian authorities denied the report.


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Based on the body evidence retrieved after the crash of the EgyptAir Airbus A320, an unnamed Egyptian forensic official told the Associated Press that the evidence point to an explosion on board. “The logical explanation is that an explosion brought it down,” the official told AP.

The Egyptian official, who is part of the Egyptian team investigating the crash that killed all 66 people on board the flight from Paris to Cairo early last Thursday, has personally examined the remains at a Cairo morgue. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorised to release the information.

According to AP, Egyptian authorities have said they believe terrorism is a more likely explanation than equipment failure, but France’s aviation accident investigation agency would not comment on anything.

Today, it was also reported by AP, that Ehab Azmy, who is head of Egypt’s state-run provider of air navigation services said that the plane did not swerve and change direction before it disappeared, as it was previously suggested by Greek Defence Minister, Panos Kamenos.

Azmy, said that the plane had been flying at its normal height of 11,280m before dropping off the radar. “That fact degrades what the Greeks are saying about the aircraft suddenly losing altitude before it vanished from radar,” he said.

“There was no turning to the right or left, and it was fine when it entered Egypt’s FIR [flight information region], which took nearly a minute or two before it disappeared,” he concluded.

After the fatal crash, Kamenos told reporters that the plane turned 90 degrees then 360-degrees before plummeting into the sea.

Yesterday, British daily The Telegraph reported another conflicting report. According to the French TV Station M6, which cited French aviation sources in Paris, Mohamed Ali Shoukair, the pilot of the plane, told Egyptian air traffic controllers that he would attempt an emergency landing as the plane was filling up with smoke. M6 reported that there is a recorded conversation of “several minutes” between the pilot and the controllers.

However, EgyptAir officials have denied M6’s report, saying that “[the] claims made by the French TV station are not true. The pilot did not contact Egypt air control before the incident.”

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