Dutch eggs embroiled in a second insecticide contamination case within a year

PATRICK HUISMAN

Eggs being destroyed at a poultry farm in Onstwedde, the Netherlands, 03 August 2017. The eggs are being destroyed on the order of the Dutch Food and Welfare Authority (NVWA) after it was discovered they contain toxic levels of the pesticide Fipronil.

Dutch eggs embroiled in a second insecticide contamination case within a year


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Six German states will pull 73,000 eggs imported from an organic farm in the Netherlands and delivered between the 17 of May and June 4.

The eggs are believed to be contaminated by an insecticide called fipronil, used to treat lice on animals. Agriculture officials do not believe there are risks to human health. However, German controllers found that the residue of fipronil in eggs coming from that farm was above the 0,005mg per kilo benchmark set by the EU.

This is the second time the Dutch egg industry is embroiled in a consumer safety scandal due to the use of fipronil, with millions of Dutch eggs withdrawn from shelves across Europe in August 2017.

Recently, the Dutch food and consumer safety authority (NVWA) was investigating whether the fipronil scandal – costing the sector millions – was discouraging free-range egg production. The question is whether farmers are keen to keep to avoid bird flu and reluctant to risk the use of fipronil.

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