Cyprus negotiations resume November 20 in Geneva

FABRICE COFFRINI / POOL

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon (C) poses with Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci (L) and Greek Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades (R) at the beginning of Cyprus Peace Talks, in Mont Pelerin, Switzerland, 07 November 2016. Cyprus' Greek and Turkish speaking communities will conduct a key phase of reunification talks, under the aegis of the United Nations (UN) from 07 to 11 November.

Cyprus negotiations resume November 20 in Geneva


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Negotiations for the reunification of Cyprus will resume on November 20.

The President of the Republic of Cyprus and the Turkish Cypriot leader have made “significant progress” during last week’s according to a UN statement.

The Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades and the Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci spent five days at the luxury resort of Mont Pelerin in Switzerland; they were addressing issues such as property and territorial delineation of the Greek and Turkish constituent entities of a future federation.

Apparently, the two leaders have reached an overall preliminary agreement on the territorial issue, agreeing on principles that will determine the delineation of territory. Some of the principles discussed were population return, land percentages, and access to the coastline.

Cyprus was divided in 1974, following the invasion of the Turkish army in response to a coup aiming at uniting the island with Greece backed by the colonel’s regime.

Turkish sources suggest that the break in negotiation was requested by President Nicos Anastasiades.

If negotiations fail, the Turkish President Erdogan has let it be known that he is ready to annex the north of the island to Turkey. That threat will inevitably be seen as leverage for the Turkish Cypriot leader, who could demand security guarantees such as the continued presence of Turkish troops on the island. The Greek-Cypriot side has made clear there will be no “land-for-security” exchange.

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