Corbyn’s Labour Party leadership in question

WILL OLIVER

Britain's Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn delivers a speech at a 'Vote Remain' event in London, Britain, 22 June 2016.

Corbyn’s Labour Party leadership in question


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After Prime Minister David Cameron resigned, the leader of the British opposition Jeremy Corbyn is to face a leadership challenge.

A number of Members of Parliament are moving to accuse the leader of the Labour Party for failing to mobilize the working class in favor of Remain, pointing towards a half-hearted support of the campaign.

Asked on June 11, how much behind the cause of EU membership he actually was, he responded “seven, or seven and a half” out of 10. He explained that EU membership in his view was better for “social cohesion” and “human rights”.

A number of media are now reporting that upwards of 51 MPs required to pose a leadership challenge are ready to do so. This requires individual letters being send to the party’s general secretary Iain McNicol, the party will have to head towards a Conference and put up ballot boxes again for a leadership contest as soon as September.

MPs have already started delivering letters, beginning with Margaret Hodge and Ann Coffey.

The motion would be followed by a ballot of the PLP on Tuesday, to give a symbolic show of collective criticism with the leadership.

The name mattered by everyone is that of Sadiq Khan, the newly elected Mayor of London. He is young, Muslim, and seems to express the views of the party establishment although it is unclear how this would play out with the tens of thousands that joined Corbyn in an effort to push the Labour Party to the Left. There are of course many more names: a military man, Dan Jarvi, as well as Keir Starmer, Angela Eagle, Chris Leslie, Owen Smith could decide to bid for the post. Some believe that Corbyn does have the choice of putting his support behind Shadow Chancellor McDonnell rather than standing his ground.

But, the dice has been cast for a standoff that was always looming, even as Jeremy Corbyn won by a landslide in 2015. Those who advocate a snap leadership contest fear that with the smashing defeat of Remain in most Labour strongholds, Corbyn’s leadership has already been tainted with the distinct possibility of a historically crushing defeat that would consolidate the apparent earthquake that is taking hold of the British political system.

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