Conservative manifesto targets elderly, immigrants

EPA/ANDY RAIN

Elderly women enjoy a peaceful read on deck-chairs in Hyde Park in London, Britain

Conservative manifesto targets elderly, immigrants


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Elderly care in England could become more expensive and complex under proposals outlined in the Conservative party manifesto that was published on May 18. By changing certain thresholds, people could end up paying more towards the cost of their care.

According to the BBC, currently anyone with assets of over £23,250 is expected to pay the full cost of their care. If you are in a care home or nursing home, the value of your house can be considered. However, if you receive care in your own home it is only your savings and income which are taken into account.

But the Tory manifesto promises to change that. Instead, the value of your home may be factored in, no matter where care is provided.

The manifesto argues the plans are more generous because they raise the threshold your assets should deplete to before you get council help from £23,250 to £100,000.

According to the BBC, however, the changes may be less helpful for homeowners.

Three-quarters of people over the age of 65 are homeowners and the average value of a property in England is £233,000.

And for those with very high care needs – for one in 10 they exceed £100,000 – it means you will pay more than you would have under the £72,000 care cap that was the policy at the last election but has now been ditched.

Who does benefit? The Tories are not providing any modelling on numbers, but there seems to be two main groups – cash-rich non-homeowners and homeowners of low-value properties (or at least properties they don’t have much equity in), explained the BBC’s healthcare correspondent.

In other related news, Business Insider noted that the Conservative party Manifesto also includes the doubling of the charge companies must pay each year for every for every skilled non-EU migrant they employ.

“Skilled immigration should not be a way for government or business to avoid their obligations to improve the skills of the British workforce,” it reads.

“So we will double the Immigration Skills Charge levied on companies employing migrant workers, to £2,000 a year by the end of the parliament, using the revenue generated to invest in higher level skills training for workers in the UK.”

The manifesto also promises to reduce net migration to the UK to the tens of thousands a year.

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