Connecting the Internet of Things, Globally

Connecting the Internet of Things, Globally


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Last week, AT&T joined others in the wireless industry for Mobile World Congress in Barcelona to exchange ideas, unveil new technologies, and explore the broader changes taking place in the mobile ecosystem. There was plenty of talk about the next wave of the mobile internet – the Internet of Things.

In conjunction with Mobile World Congress, AT&T made a few machine-to-machine (M2M) technology announcements that will support various industries:

  • Utilities: AT&T and IBM announced a new global alliance agreement to develop solutions that help support the “Internet of Things” that will initially focus on creating new solutions targeted for city governments and midsize utilities. The AT&T and IBM alliance intends to integrate and analyze vast quantities of aggregated and anonymized data from assets such as mass transit vehicles, utility meters, and video cameras so cities may be able to better evaluate patterns and trends.
  • Healthcare: InterMetro, a business of Emerson and a leading manufacturer and supplier of storage and transport products for the food service, commercial and healthcare industries, is working with AT&T to create “smart” mobile workstations that allow caregivers to access treatment information and update patient medical records at patients’ bedsides.
  • Automotive: Three additional companies have signed on to work with the connected car industry at the AT&T Drive Studio, a first-of-its-kind connected car center for innovation and research in Atlanta.

There is not an industry that hasn’t already been affected, or that will not be even more radically affected in the coming years, by virtue of the mobile Internet. Cisco estimates M2M connections will grow from 341 million in 2013 to over 2 billion by 2018.

For M2M device manufacturers to connect their devices across the globe, they often look to partner with a mobile network operator that can use their roaming agreements and one global SIM to deliver wireless connectivity in all, or nearly all, of the countries where they want to operate. This single platform, and the global SIM, approach to M2M deployment substantially reduces barriers to market entry for M2M device manufacturers, particularly for smaller entrants that would not otherwise have sufficient resources to compete on a global scale.

To promote global M2M connectivity, it’s critical for policymakers to help ensure future-focused regulatory models that pave the way. From promoting flexible numbering policies to enabling cross-border data flows, we can bring the societal and economic benefits of innovation to more people.

– See more at: http://www.attglobalpolicy.com/connecting-the-internet-of-things-globally/#sthash.X0GG1Q3h.dpuf

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